Competencies

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Digital Discipleship Technology Competencies for Ministry

We are pleased to present the following technology competency standards for Digital Discipleship. As an organization, Digital Disciple Network has been involved in training ministers in the use of digital technologies since 2011. Previously, we have used the ISTE Standards as our guiding principles. With six years of experience under our belt, and in collaboration with representatives from Digital Disciple Network (DDN), International Society for Technology and Education (ISTE), National Association of Catholic Media Partners (NACMP), and National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA), we have created a set of standards to guide the ministry community in the integration of technology in faith settings.

  1. Community Discipleship – Ministers employ technology for creating faith relationships with others.
  2. Digital Citizenship –  Ministers recognize the rights, responsibilities, and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal, and ethical.
  3. Digital Communicator – Ministers use a variety of platforms and digital tools to evangelize and share faith.
  4. Mobile Evangelization and Catechesis – Ministers can “sow the seed” of faith, engaging others in sharing their faith online through mobile tools.
  5. Collaborative Disciple – Ministers foster digital collaboration, both with students and colleagues.
  6. Digital Curator – Ministers critically curate a variety of resources using digital tools to provide meaningful learning experiences for themselves and others.

Each competencies has several components, as listed below.

  1. Community Discipleship – Ministers engage technology for creating faith relationships with others.

a. Ministers develop ways to reach out to their online communities to share personal experiences, testimonies of their own personal faith journey, prayer for the needs of the online community, and to celebrate special occasions like birthdays, accomplishments, etc.

b. Ministers share inspirational insights with online friends and companions to encourage each other toward living with Christ-like characteristics in their everyday lives. They introduce spiritual content into their use of social media.  Ministers model being their authentic selves in relationship with Jesus.

c. Ministers build networks and customize their teaching the faith to support faith formation in both face-to-face and online environments.

d. Ministers understand the basics of social media, demonstrate the ability to choose, use, and troubleshoot current social technologies, and are able to transfer their knowledge to explore emerging technologies.

e. Ministers adapt technology to develop relationships in the contexts of faith formation, evangelization, peace and justice, and interfaith dialogue.

2. Digital CitizenshipMinisters recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal, and ethical.

a. Ministers cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world.

b. Ministers engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behaviors when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.

c. Ministers demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.

d. Ministers manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data collection technology used to track their navigation online.

e. Ministers are aware of and follow the articulated technology policies that are shared by the USCCB, NFCYM, and their diocese or parish.

  1. Digital CommunicatorMinisters use digital tools to communicate to their audience using a variety of platforms and tools to evangelize and share faith.

a. Ministers use social media, online content, digital photography and more to reach and share resources with a ministry audience.

b. Ministers are able to use various digital tools (e.g., a blog tool) as a virtual bulletin board for ministry sharing devotional thoughts, encouragement, outreach, to interact with their audiences.

c. Ministers are able to create and teach Digital Stories as an interactive message to bring the Word of God to their audiences.

d. Ministers are able to coach others in facilitating use of digital skills and content creation.

e. Ministers are able to use collaborative digital tools for faith formation (e.g., brainstorming, creating a list, or writing a document).

f. Ministers are able to convene a live meeting using interactive digital meeting platforms.

  1. Mobile Evangelization and CatechesisMinisters are able to “sow the seed” engaging others in sharing their faith online through mobile tools.

a. Ministers use digital mobile devices to enhance faith formation at all levels.

b. Ministers responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations to deepen faith formation.

c. Ministers review and choose online faith content that is appropriate for an intended audience.

d. Ministers create opportunities to pray online

e. Ministers use online tools and apps for Bible study and to enhance their understanding of Jesus.

f. Ministers promote and practice a digital learning culture that provides relevant and practical learning experiences for their faith community (family, RCIA, youth, etc.).

g. Ministers publish or present a digital story that customizes a faith message for their audiences.

h. Ministers create websites that are mobile-optimized with responsive design.

  1. Collaborative DiscipleMinisters are able to engage in digital collaboration.

a. Ministers strive to work collaboratively with others developing needed digital collaboration skills.

b. Ministers are able to use collaborative digital tools to find and share information.

c. Ministers are able to develop a digital workplace that leads to engaged, productive collaborators who innovate and create 21st Century digital Faith Formation.

d. Ministers are able to collaborate with others to create products that are shared in a digital format.

  1. Digital CuratorMinisters critically curate a variety of resources using digital tools to provide meaningful learning experiences for themselves and others.

a. Ministers are able to identify a website as Catholic and to determine if it is sponsored by the Vatican, the USCCB, a Diocese, a Parish, a Catholic Publisher, a Catholic University, or by an individual or group.

b. Ministers are able to identify the author of a resource by name and who they represent – Vatican, diocese, parish, publisher, university, self, their degree(s), and other helpful information.

c. Ministers are able to identify when the content was created, i.e., whether the information is current or dated.

d. Ministers are able to determine why a site exists, and to identify bias.

e. Ministers are able to curate existing Catholic content on the web to enrich the resources available to all.

f. Ministers are able to share balanced and authoritative teachings of the Catholic Church, reflecting post-Vatican II theology and pastoral practice.

 

© 2017 Digital Disciple Network. Some Rights Reserved. These standards contain some content adapted from the ISTE Standards for Students. – http://www.iste.org/standards/standards